Event Picture

Events

CCPP events include astrophysics seminars, high energy seminars, experimental particle physics (hep-ex) seminars, Colloquium, CCPP Brown Bag, and some group meetings, informal talks, etc.. Events can be viewed with Events Daily,  Events List or Events Calendar format.

Upcoming Events

Quantum Error Correction at large N for von Neumann algebras and quantum gravity
Thomas Faulkner, UIUC
Event Type: Informal HEP Talk

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2024

Time: 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: I will discuss a new framework for constructing quantum error correcting codes out of large N limits. The code subspace can accommodate quantum field theory with an associated local algebraic description. Using several examples I will demonstrate that these codes give a natural framework for studying the emergence of spacetime and locality in AdS/CFT.
Body Temperature of Dinosaurs
John Eiler, Caltech
Event Type: Physics Dept Colloquium

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2024

Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: The study of life’s origin, evolution and distribution in the universe involves many questions that seem unsolvable on first inspection; a familiar example concerns the body temperatures of the dinosaurs: Should we look at their fossilized skeletons and imagine vigorous, warm-blooded, bird-like animals, or plodding, sedentary reptiles like modern alligators? This question has often been approached through qualitative arguments based on phylogeny, histology, ecology and other loose correlatives with metabolism — disappointing if you want the kind of direct and quantitative data a veterinarian might gather with a well-aimed thermometer. Recent advances in studies of the chemical physics of isotopes has provided surprisingly nuanced and precise answers to this question. Well-preserved tooth enamel and egg shells of dinosaurs and other ancient vertebrates contain carbonate groups (CO3-2) that were drawn from their host’s blood stream and represent fossil remnants of their metabolic chemistry. The heavy rare isotopes, 13C and 18O, are present as trace substitutions in these carbonate groups, in amounts that reflect a variety of factors, such as diet and local climate. But the state of organization of those rare isotopes — their propensity to ‘stick’ to one another with a shared chemical bond as opposed to being randomly scattered across a population of molecules — is controlled by the temperature dependent changes in vibrational energy caused by isotopic substitution. I will present the latest discoveries revealed by exceptionally sensitive and precise measurements of isotopic ordering in fossils of ancient vertebrates, revealing their body temperatures and informing inferences regarding their metabolism, physiology, lifestyle and ecology.
Strings From Feynman Diagrams
Edward Mazenc, ETH Zurich
Event Type: Informal HEP Talk

Date: Friday, April 19, 2024

Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: How are bulk strings related to boundary Feynman diagrams? I will give an overview of my work with Rajesh Gopakumar on deriving the closed string dual to the simplest possible gauge theory, a Hermitian matrix integral. Working in the conventional ‘t Hooft limit, we extract topological string theories which replace the minimal string away from the double-scaling limit. We show how to exactly reconstruct both the closed string worldsheet and its embedding into the emergent target space, purely from the matrix Feynman diagrams. Along the way, we will encounter the notion of open-closed-open triality which allows us to establish this dictionary, and predicts multiple open string descriptions of the same bulk physics. I’ll close by embedding our results in the broader context of AdS/CFT.
The new science of life's origins and distribution in the universe
John Eiler, Caltech
Event Type: Special Seminar

Date: Friday, April 19, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: The study of the origins of life and its possible existence beyond the earth has long lived in the liminal space between science, quasi-scientific speculation, and nonsense. Nevertheless, the questions that motivate this field are among the greatest unanswered problems in the natural sciences and human thought more broadly. The modern era of this subject began in the 1990’s with a wave of top-down funding agency investments and several highly visible and equally ludicrous false starts. But recently this subject has transformed its scope, methods and opportunities, and has radically expanded and re-organized its connections to more established, rigorous fields, including astronomy, synthetic chemistry, geology, geochemistry, and the biological ‘omics’ disciplines. The last decade has seen dramatic progress on several interconnected fronts, yet the field remains ravenous for its first truly transformative discovery. The central questions remain: What will constitute definitive evidence of life’s origins on earth and existence in the wider universe; and, how should we best seek that evidence?
Zare
Event Type: HEP Discussion Sessions

Date: Friday, April 19, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Applied special relativity: Velocities of stars measured at the cm/s level
David Hogg, New York University
Event Type: CCPP Brown Bag

Date: Monday, April 22, 2024

Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: Planets are being discovered and measured using radial-velocity (Doppler shift) measurements. Current precision, even for the best spectrographs, is currently limited at 1 m/s, in part because it is non-trivial to even *define* a Doppler shift at better precision. We (Megan Bedell, Lily Zhao, DWH, and others) have new ideas for improving precisions by a factor of 10 or 30. The discovery and measurement of true Earth analogs require a factor of 10 at least.
Mapping the Expansion History with DESI Y1 data
Nikhil Padmanabhan, Yale
Event Type: Astro Seminar

Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: I will present the recently released distance measurements from the first year of DESI data using the baryon acoustic oscillation technique. I will review the improvements made in this analysis, highlight our blinded analysis and will emphasize the robustness of the BAO technique. I will then explore the cosmological implications of these results, including a tantalizing hint of time variations in dark energy.
Grad Pheno Journal Club
Event Type: Grad Pheno Journal Club

Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

T Daniel Brennan, UCSD
Event Type: HEP Seminar

Date: Wednesday, April 24, 2024

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

TBA
Nick Faucher
Event Type: Oral Defense

Date: Thursday, April 25, 2024

Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

The Quantum Revolution: Emerging Technologies at the Atomic Scale
David Awschalom, University of Chicago
Event Type: Physics Dept Colloquium

Date: Thursday, April 25, 2024

Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: Traditional electronics are rapidly approaching the length scale of atoms and molecules. In this regime, a single atom out of place can have outsized negative consequences and so scaling down classical technologies requires ever-more perfect control of materials. Surprisingly, one of the most promising pathways out of this conundrum may emerge from current efforts to embrace these atomic ‘defects’ to construct devices that enable new information processing, communication, and sensing technologies based on the quantum nature of electrons and atomic nuclei. In addition to their charge, individual defects in semiconductors and molecules possess an electronic spin state that can be employed as a quantum bit. These qubits can be manipulated and read using a simple combination of light and microwaves with a built-in optical interface and retain their quantum properties over millisecond to second timescales. With these foundations in hand, we discuss emerging opportunities and the importance of collaborating with industry to atomically-engineer qubits for nuclear memories, entangled registers, sensors and networks for science and technology.
The universal multiplicity function: counting halos and voids
Giovanni Verza, New York University
Event Type: CCPP Brown Bag

Date: Monday, April 29, 2024

Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Core-collapse supernovae as probes of (not only) non-standard neutrino physics
Anna Suliga, U. C. Berkeley
Event Type: Astro Seminar

Date: Tuesday, April 30, 2024

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: Core-collapse supernovae are one of the most complex phenomena in the Universe. Not only are they one of the production sites of the heavy elements that enable the existence of life, but their cores are also one of the densest environments we can probe, albeit indirectly. Core-collapse supernovae are also among the most spectacular and efficient neutrino factories. Detecting these neutrinos can allow us to probe physics in extreme conditions inaccessible on Earth. In this talk, I will discuss how we can prepare for the next nearby supernova neutrino detection to extract as much information as possible from the neutrino signal. I will also talk about how observing neutrinos from all the past collapses in our Universe – the diffuse supernova neutrino background - can help us better understand the supernova population and may provide hints about physics beyond the Standard Model.
Grad Pheno Journal Club
Event Type: Grad Pheno Journal Club

Date: Tuesday, April 30, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

HEP/Pheno Journal Club
Event Type: ArXiv Discussion

Date: Wednesday, May 1, 2024

Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

TBA
Michael Toomey, MIT
Event Type: HEP Seminar

Date: Wednesday, May 1, 2024

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: TBA
TBA
Conghuan Luo
Event Type: Oral Defense

Date: Thursday, May 2, 2024

Time: 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Defect Propelled Swimming of Nematic Colloids
Kathleen Stebe, University of Pennsylvania
Event Type: Physics Dept Colloquium

Date: Thursday, May 2, 2024

Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Abstract: We have been studying active colloids in nematic liquid crystals as microrobots for materials manipulation. Colloid shape and surface chemistry can generate long-ranged emergent interactions in quasi-static settings. Furthermore, the non-linear response of the nematic fluid host allows interactions that differ strikingly in range and form from their static counterparts. Colloid dynamic displacement can introduce defects whose dynamics generate new modalities of motion and interaction. These interactions provide a rich toolkit for assembly and open important fundamental questions regarding swimming at low Reynolds number in a nematic, and the roles of broken symmetry, elastic energy storage and far from equilibrium topological defects.
Zare
Event Type: HEP Discussion Sessions

Date: Friday, May 3, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Adventures in Dark Matter-Baryon Interactions
Jiarong Zhu and Connor Hainje, New York University
Event Type: CCPP Brown Bag

Date: Monday, May 6, 2024

Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 940, CCPP Seminar

Grad Pheno Journal Club
Event Type: Grad Pheno Journal Club

Date: Tuesday, May 7, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Zare
Event Type: HEP Discussion Sessions

Date: Friday, May 10, 2024

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Location: 726 Broadway, 902, Lg Conf

Event Type: CUWiP

Date: Friday, January 24, 2025

Time: 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Location: