Events Calendar

 November 2023        
MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday
30
Rashid Sunyaev, X-Ray and microwave cosmology: synergy and competition. What do we expect from the next generation X-ray and microwave telescopes? (11:00 AM - 12:15 PM)

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Soubhik Kumar, Gravitational Waves as Probes of Small-scale Primordial Fluctuations (12:30 PM - 1:30 PM)

Ameen Ismail, Relevant dilaton stabilization (2:00 PM - 3:00 PM)

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Shahrzad Zare, How generalized symmetry provides us with an explanation for the monopole scattering problem (2:00 PM - 3:50 PM)

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31
, Confining Strings Workshop (9:00 AM - 6:00 PM)

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Rashid Sunyaev, SRG/eRosita: An all-sky X-ray map, showing tens of thousands of galaxy clusters, 100 tidal disruption events and the variability of millions of quasars, AGNs and flaring stars (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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Ahmed Almheiri, Exposing the Secrets of Black Holes (4:30 PM - 6:00 PM)

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1
, Confining Strings Workshop (9:00 AM - 6:00 PM)

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David Gross, Fifty Years of Quantum Chromodynamics (The Theory of The Strong Nuclear Force) (2:00 PM - 3:30 PM)

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, CCPP Pheno Journal Club (3:30 PM - 4:30 PM)

2
3
Popov, Postdoc HepTh Discussion Group (12:00 PM - 1:30 PM)

Alexandra Zidovska, Undergrad Research Fair (12:15 PM - 2:15 PM)

Thibault Damour, Black Hole Binary Dynamics from Classical and Quantum Gravitational Scattering (2:30 PM - 3:45 PM)

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6
Simon Lin, Operator algebras in high energy physics (12:30 PM - 1:30 PM)

Zare (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

7
Katie Harrington, Pre-deployment Optical Testing for the Simons Observatory (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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8
Andy Haas et al., Ptolemy Experiment / BBn neutrinos (10:30 AM - 12:30 PM)

Riccardo Rattazzi, Softening the UV without new particles (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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, CCPP Pheno Journal Club (3:30 PM - 4:30 PM)

Patrick Breysse (8:00 PM - 9:30 PM)

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9
Naomi Ginsberg, Following and Controlling Formation and Function of Bottom-up Assembled Nanomaterials (4:00 PM - 5:30 PM)

-- Abstract: Design advances for the bottom-up assembly of highly ordered functional nanomaterials have generated a wide range of fundamental questions that must be answered to continue to advance material properties, such as strong electronic and mechanical coupling. Compared to the microscale realm of self-assembling soft matter, nanoscale building blocks are generally more challenging to manipulate with a high degree of tunability to achieve different desirable outcomes. This challenge is predicated on scale itself – it is difficult to specify the interparticle interactions of nanoscale building blocks in the solution phase due to the non-additivity of different attractive and repulsive contributions, especially because of the finite size of solvent molecules relative to the building blocks themselves. We nevertheless focus on colloidal nanocrystal advances that incorporate electrostatics to promote the formation of ordered superlattice structures from nanocrystals with high dielectric constants.1 Through a multiscale suite of hard X-ray scattering experiments ranging from small- to wide-angle, incoherent to coherent, and storage ring to free electron laser, we characterize the phases, their fluctuations, and the dynamic interconversion between phases of this enigmatic system, non-invasively and in real-time, identifying the helpful role of a liquid-like intermediate phase that admits an unusually high degree of control over supercrystalline product yield, size, and order. We find that controlled, ordered assembly requires a balance of surface charge, screening, and van der Waals attraction that is facilitated by moderate to high dielectric ratios between the nanocrystals and their surroundings. We also find that laser absorption reversibly suppresses growth of the ordered superlattice phase and intend to leverage these finding to infer strategies to self-assemble more common low-dielectric nanocrystals into ordered structures by driving them far from equilibrium with optical excitation. Energy transport in these and other materials is an important emergent property to also characterize at the nanoscale, especially since the solids created often still contain nanoscale heterogeneities. Time-permitting, I will therefore also share recent advances in tracking the motion of ions and photogenerated charge carriers, excitons, and heat using time-resolved optical elastic scattering.2,3 I will not only show how these forms of energy navigate through heterogeneous landscapes but also how we sensitively measure dynamic temperature changes over the course of photogenerated energy transduction in conducting and semiconducting materials, introducing a unique form of nanoscale non-contact thermometry.4 1. Coropceanu, I. et al. Self-assembly of nanocrystals into strongly electronically coupled all-inorganic supercrystals. Science 375, 1422–1426 (2022). 2. Delor, M., Weaver, H. L., Yu, Q. & Ginsberg, N. S. Imaging material functionality through three-dimensional nanoscale tracking of energy flow. Nat. Mater. 19, 56–62 (2020); Utterback, J. K. et al. Nanoscale Disorder Generates Subdiffusive Heat Transport in Self-Assembled Nanocrystal Films. Nano Lett. 21, 3540–3547 (2021). 3. J. K. Utterback, A. J. King, L. Belman-Wells, D. M. Larson, L. M. Hamerlynck, A. Z. Weber, N. S. Ginsberg (2023). “Operando Label-free Optical Imaging of Solution-Phase Ion Transport and Electrochemistry,” ACS Energy Lett., 8:1785–1792. DOI:10.1021/acsenergylett.3c00129 4. H. L. Weaver, C. M. Went, J. Wong, D. Jasrasaria, E. Rabani, H. A. Atwater, N. S. Ginsberg (2023). “Detecting, Distinguishing, and Spatiotemporally Tracking Photogenerated Charge and Heat on the Nanoscale,” ACS Nano, ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.3c04607

10
, Memorial Service for Prof. Emeritus Ed Robinson (9:00 AM - 5:00 PM)

Popov, Postdoc HepTh Discussion Group (12:00 PM - 1:30 PM)

13
Shirley Ho, Foundation Models for Science (12:30 PM - 1:30 PM)

Zare (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

Chi-Ming Chang, Black hole microstates in AdS (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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14
, Global Categorical Symmetries Workshop (8:00 AM - 6:00 PM)

Aaron Yung, Challenges and first results on modeling halos and galaxies in the ultra-high-redshift universe (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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15
, Global Categorical Symmetries Workshop (8:00 AM - 6:00 PM)

, No HEP Seminar (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

16
Zeba Wunderlich, Noise and Competition: Mechanisms of Gene Expression Control in the Early Embryo (4:00 PM - 5:30 PM)

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17
Popov, Postdoc HepTh Discussion Group (12:00 PM - 1:30 PM)

Xinyi Chen, Probing primordial non-Gaussianity by reconstructing the initial conditions with machine learning (12:00 PM - 12:30 PM)

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20
Patrick Rieck, A perspective on the future of experimental particle physics (12:30 PM - 1:30 PM)

Zare (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

21
22
, No Classes; University closes @ 4pm

, CCPP Pheno Journal Club (3:30 PM - 4:30 PM)

23
, University Closed

24
, University Closed

Popov, Postdoc HepTh Discussion Group (12:00 PM - 1:30 PM)

27
(12:30 PM - 1:30 PM)

Zare (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

28
Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil, The Smallest and Faintest Galaxies: Clues to the Nature of Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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29
Asimina Arvanitaki, The Cosmic Neutrino Background (CνB): Its distribution on the surface of the Earth and its manipulation on laboratory scales (2:00 PM - 3:15 PM)

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30
Chiara Mingarelli, The NANOGrav Experiment: Current Results and Future Directions (3:00 PM - 4:30 PM)

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1
Popov, Postdoc HepTh Discussion Group (12:00 PM - 1:30 PM)

James Sullivan, Galaxies Remember Inflation - New Aspects of Local Primordial non-Gaussianity in Galaxy Surveys (12:00 PM - 12:30 PM)

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